Columnists Diana Jarrett The Story Behind the Stone Sometimes beauty is only skin deep

The Story Behind the Stone Sometimes beauty is only skin deep

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All naturally colored diamonds are rare. In an ideal scenario, diamonds are formed from a single element, that being pure carbon - rendering them exquisitely colorless. Their tint can come from a variety of trace elements that intrude into the molecular structure of the mineral. But color can also result from mechanisms not fully understood. How are color-change diamonds created exactly - or pink, for that matter? The jury is still out on that mysterious transpiration.

 

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Green diamond studs from Etienne Perret. Image courtesy of Etienne Perret.
When it comes to natural green diamonds, scientists tell us, it is the result of that diamond’s close encounter with naturally occurring subterranean radiation. Therefore with the very few green diamonds that make up the global harvest annually, many will have their green tint most present on the skin of the crystal - the very outer surface.

Green diamonds are scrutinized thoroughly in order for the cutter to best determine how to approach polishing this rarity and to conserve as much green as possible on the finished stone.

Few people have the privilege of seeing a fancy color green diamond, outside of a handful in museums around the world. The most famous green diamond that the public can view is the 41 carat Dresden Green Diamond displayed in a German museum.

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Etienne Perret’s enhanced green diamond pave clasp paired with golden pearls. Image courtesy of Etienne Perret.
Fortunately, diamond lovers can treat themselves to enhanced green diamonds which pack a punch on any jewelry item featuring them. Couture designer Etienne Perret knows just how to show off these verdant beauties with his luxurious enhanced green diamond pave clasp paired artfully to some yummy golden pearls. Perret’s enhanced green diamond stud earrings are another way to focus on the intense vivid color produced in these diamonds.

Graduate Gemologist and Registered Master Valuer Diana Jarrett is also a member of the National Association of Jewelry Appraisers (NAJA). She’s a frequent lecturer at conferences and trade shows. Jarrett serves as Colored Stone Editor for Rapaport Diamond Report; with other works regularly appearing in trade and consumer publications. Contact her at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or visit her website: www.dianajarrett.com.

 
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