Last updateMon, 23 Nov 2015 10pm


No shortcut to the success counter

Most of us like to contemplate how life will be “when we hit the big time.” As soon as we begin to visualize “SUCCESS!”, we begin designing our life and life-style as it will be.

“Will I be a Bill Gates?” “Will I be a Kardashian?” “Shall I plan on buying a Bentley?” “How many swimming pools will I want?”

Be the expert that you want to be - and that your customers deserve

What motivates the retail professional? Is it the desire to serve the customer? Is it the ability to use a variety of sales techniques to showcase the product to its best advantage? Is it the need to be at the top of the competitive heap within an industry? Is it the opportunity to increase personal income through improving standards of excellence? Is it the contribution to the community at large by providing a quality resource?

Pay attention to the heart and the head and you’ll get what’s in the wallet

Often, we are so busy focusing on completing a sale that we forget the actual person who is in our store! We are so busy qualifying our buyer and planning which merchandise we want to show them that we overlook the human being who stands before us. As I have stated many times, the real goal of a sales presentation is to create Personal Trade, Repeat Business and customers that will proactively give referrals and recommendations to their friends, relatives and others.

It takes hard work!

Not every salesperson is blessed with the natural abilities that we would all love to have. Most of us have to be grinders and have to work for everything that we have. It is the grinders that, in the long run, make the best salespeople. Of course there are certain techniques that we all learn and different processes that we all have, but at its heart, selling is about work. If you are willing to work, then you can be a successful salesperson.

Actions vs. Results

Too many owners and managers work on correcting results, rather than working on correcting the actions that caused the results. To try to improve a result is pointless unless the actions that caused the results have been addressed and corrected. Supervisors often times talk to their people about not hitting their sales goals, add-on percentages, closing ratios, etc. Telling them that they have to make improvements or start making the numbers is similar to a sports coach telling their players that they need to score more points.

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