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Last updateTue, 30 Jun 2015 12pm

Featured Articles

Shefi Diamonds’ 4th generation honors family traditions of honesty, integrity, hard work

When Sanjay Hirawat reflects on the success of his family business, he speaks with great reverence about his father, Dharam Chand Hirawat. It seems everyone knows his dad, who’s widely regarded as knowledgeable, honorable and true to his work, not only to individuals but to the community at large. Customers and vendors alike call him “Mr. Shefi.”


How a Florida jeweler recovered large stolen diamond

For a 6.04-carat diamond, the pleasant passage of commemorating a milestone moment in a customer’s life was abruptly interrupted when a diamond-set ring was stolen from Old Northeast Jewelers in St. Petersburg, Florida. After more than a year of online searches, phone calls and tenacious follow-ups with authorities, store owners Jeffrey Hess and his wife Katrina found and eventually recovered their store’s lost treasure.

Innovation drives LaserStar’s growth

LaserStar Technologies is a company always on the move – upgrading designs, introducing new products and opening new facilities. The company’s passion for progress pays: During the past 24 months, LaserStar Technologies’ worldwide sales have increased by 20 percent.

Orlando, Fla., is home to the latest upgrade – a manufacturing facility surpassing the previous sales and training facility there, encompassing 12,000 square feet. The new location, which opened its doors last October, houses 22 employees and complements LaserStar’s flagship Rhode Island manufacturing facility, which boasts 25,000 square feet.

Four generations and 115 years of Waller & Company Jewelers

One of the oldest African American retailers in the US

The jewelry industry is a smelting pot of races and cultures from across the globe. The people are a rich mix of various religions, nationalities and cultures who bring their unique skills and customs to the business.

But where are the African American jewelers? Where are the men and women of color with a passion for gemology and a desire to create jewelry-art like only they can?

Cause for celebration - Atlanta Jewelry Show 65th anniversary edition

(ATLANTA) - Buoyed by strong Christmas and Valentine’s Day business, as well as reduced gas prices and a rising stock market, retailers and vendors alike had a spring in their step during the Spring 2015 Atlanta Jewelry Show, February 28 - March 2 at the Cobb Galleria Center. Providing the perfect backdrop to kick off the show’s 65th Anniversary celebration, attendance tracked slightly ahead of the 2014 edition and an optimistic atmosphere permeated the exhibition floor.

From flea markets to estate jewelry market leader

With Millennials marrying in record numbers, “something old” includes more than a handed down wedding dress. Ernest Perry, owner of Perry’s Fine Antique & Estate Jewelry, is reaping huge sales benefits with today’s bridal jewelry customers by establishing his Charlotte-based store as one of North Carolina’s leading antique and estate jewelry stores.

At Ernest’s store antique and estate jewelry accounts for about 70 percent of his inventory. The other 30 percent of his store’s inventory is new production jewelry. With his daughter Hadley working in the family store, her main goal is to incorporate the latest bridal jewelry designs to offer “something new” to marrying couples. 

Trish Parks and her unconventional road to success

When it comes to relationships few argue the fact that women have the upper hand. In fact, women from all walks of life gain personal satisfaction from emotionally connecting with others. It’s just how we’re hard-wired. But emotional connection isn’t typically viewed as an asset in business, especially if you’re the one running it. That is unless you’re Trish Parks at Corinth Jewelers in Corinth, Mississippi. Trish heads up an all-female staff at her retail jewelry store and cites her staff’s ability to relate to each and every customer as one of the cornerstones of her success.

Corinth MarStarting at the age of 16, Trish worked in jewelry for 10 years before deciding to step out of the workforce to raise her first child. Although she wasn’t gone for long, she held kept her skills sharp by working part-time at two local jewelry stores for nearly 17 years while her children were young. During those part-time years Trish dabbled in all aspects of the business, from sales to procurement to tradeshow buying; there wasn’t an area about which she didn’t learn.

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